Overview

Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582-580 BC and is… [Read more]

Thanks for your visit. If you experience any problem viewing my site or have some feedback, suggestions, please contact me under ✉ feedback@raoul-kieffer.net. Thanks in advance, this will help me to improve my site.

Photo index

Click the pictures to view them in full screen

Agrigento (1)
Agrigento (1)
Agrigento (002)
Agrigento (002)
Agrigento (003)
Agrigento (003)
Agrigento (004)
Agrigento (004)
Agrigento (010)
Agrigento (010)
Agrigento (012)
Agrigento (012)
Agrigento (017)
Agrigento (017)
Agrigento (018)
Agrigento (018)
Agrigento (020)
Agrigento (020)
Agrigento (023)
Agrigento (023)
Agrigento (026)
Agrigento (026)
Agrigento (027)
Agrigento (027)
Agrigento (029)
Agrigento (029)
Agrigento (039)
Agrigento (039)
Agrigento (041)
Agrigento (041)
Agrigento (042)
Agrigento (042)
Agrigento (043)
Agrigento (043)
Agrigento (044)
Agrigento (044)
Agrigento (045)
Agrigento (045)
Agrigento (048)
Agrigento (048)
Agrigento (049)
Agrigento (049)

Size of original pictures: 3,264 x 2,448 Pixels

Description

Agrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582-580 BC and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it Akragas. Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia. It came to prominence under the 6th century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron’s son, Thrasydaeus. Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BC. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.

The city was disputed between the Romans and the Carthaginians during the First Punic War. The Romans laid siege to the city in 262 BC and captured it after defeating a Carthaginian relief force in 261 BC and sold the population into slavery. Although the Carthaginians recaptured the city in 255 BC the final peace settlement gave Punic Sicily and with it Akragas to Rome.

It suffered badly during the Second Punic War (218-201 BC) when both Rome and Carthage fought to control it. The Romans eventually captured Akragas in 210 BC and renamed it Agrigentum, although it remained a largely Greek-speaking community for centuries thereafter. It became prosperous again under Roman rule and its inhabitants received full Roman citizenship following the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BC. After the fall of the Roman Empire, the city passed into the hands of the Ostrogothic Kingdom of Italy and then the Byzantine Empire. During this period the inhabitants of Agrigentum largely abandoned the lower parts of the city and moved to the former acropolis, at the top of the hill.

Google Maps

Javascript must be on to view the Google Map

Related links

Agrigento

Click to share on:

Or copy link: