Munich

Geography

Munich (München) is the capital and the largest city of the German state of Bavaria. It is located on the River Isar north of the Bavarian Alps. Munich is the third largest city in Germany, behind Berlin and Hamburg. About 1.42 million people live within the city limits. Munich was the host city of the 1972 Summer Olympics. Its native name, München, is derived from the Old High German Munichen, meaning "by the monks' place". The city's name derives from the monks of the Benedictine order who founded the city; hence the monk depicted on the city's coat of arms. Black and gold, the colours of the Holy Roman Empire, have been the city's official colours since the time of Ludwig the Bavarian. Modern Munich is a financial and publishing hub, and a frequently top-ranked destination for migration and expatriate location in livability rankings.

List of Sites

  • Arabellapark (1)

    Arabellapark

    (Lng: 11.617055°, Lat: 48.149574°)

    The Arabellapark is a residential and commercial area in the Bogenhausen district of Munich, Germany, which was developed with the construction of multiple buildings from 1965 to 1998. It is one of the largest urban expansion projects of the period after World War II in Munich. It takes its name from the Arabellastrasse, which runs through the project site.
  • Asam Church (Munich) (1)

    Asam Church (Munich)

    (Lng: 11.569707°, Lat: 48.135080°)

    St Johann Nepomuk, better known as the Asam Church is a church in Munich built from 1733 to 1746 by the brothers Egid Quirin Asam and Cosmas Damian Asam as their private church. The church is considered to be one of the most important buildings of the main representatives of the southern German Late Baroque. The church was built without an order, and as a private chapel for the greater glory of God and for the salvation of the builders. This allowed the brothers also to build in
  • Glyptothek (1)

    Glyptothek

    (Lng: 11.565605°, Lat: 48.146209°)

    The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures. It was designed by Leo von Klenze in the Neoclassical style, and built from 1816 to 1830. Today the museum is a part of the Kunstareal. The layout of the Königsplatz complex was designed by the architects Karl von Fischer and Leo von Klenze in 1815. Colorful frescoes and stuccos made by distinguished artists such as Peter von
  • Munich (GER)

    (Lng: 11.504971°, Lat: 48.158321°)

    The Nymphenburg Palace (Schloss Nymphenburg) is a Baroque palace in Munich. The palace was the main summer residence of the rulers of Bavaria. The palace was commissioned by the prince-electoral couple Ferdinand Maria and Henriette Adelaide of Savoy to the designs of the Italian architect Agostino Barelli in 1664 after the birth of their son Maximilian II Emanuel. The central pavilion was completed in 1675. Starting in 1701, Max Emanuel, the heir to Bavaria, a sovereign electorate
  • Museum Brandhorst

    (Lng: 11.574233°, Lat: 48.148244°)

    The Museum Brandhorst was opened in Munich on May 21, 2009. It displays about 200 exhibits from collection of modern art. Anette Brandhorst, the great-granddaughter of Henkel's founder, and her husband Udo Fritz-Hermann began collecting art in 1971. When Anette died in 1999, her husband Udo donated the collection to the state of Bavaria on the proviso that the state build it a fitting home.
  • Oktoberfest

    (Lng: 11.549088°, Lat: 48.132497°)

    The Oktoberfest is the world's largest fair held annually in Munich. It is a 16-day festival running from late September to the first weekend in October with more than 6 million people from around the world attending the event every year. To the locals, it is not called Oktoberfest, but "die Wiesn", after the colloquial name of the fairgrounds (Theresienwiese) themselves. The Oktoberfest is an important part of Bavarian culture, having been held since 1810. Large quantities of
  • Olympiapark

    (Lng: 11.549026°, Lat: 48.173841°)

    The Olympiapark in Munich, is an Olympic Park which was constructed for the 1972 Summer Olympics. Found in the area of Munich known as the "Oberwiesenfeld", the Park continues to serve as a venue for cultural and social events such as the summer festival. After the International Olympic Committee in 1966 awarded Munich the Olympic Games, plans were solidified for the urban redevelopment of the Oberwiesenfeld area. The architectural firm of Günther Behnisch and its partners developed
  • Residenz (Munich)

    (Lng: 11.578402°, Lat: 48.140415°)

    The Munich Residenz (Münchner Residenz) is the former royal palace of the Bavarian monarchs of the House of Wittelsbach in the centre of the city of Munich. The Residenz is the largest city palace in Germany. The complex of buildings contains ten courtyards and displays 130 rooms. The three main parts are the Königsbau (near the Max-Joseph-Platz), the Alte Residenz (Old Residenz; towards the Residenzstraße) and the Festsaalbau (towards the Hofgarten). A wing of the Festsaalbau
  • Umschreibung

    (Lng: 11.540222°, Lat: 48.132798°)

    The infinity staircase, designed by Ólafur Elíasson and called Umschreibung (Rewriting), was completed in 2004. Ólafur Elíasson (born 1967) is a Danish-Icelandic artist known for sculptures and large-scale installation art employing elemental materials such as light, water, and air temperature to enhance the viewer's experience.

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