Via Margutta

[19 photos]

Coordinates: 41° 54′ 28″ N, 12° 28′ 50″ E

Via Margutta

Overview

The Via Margutta is a narrow street in the centre of Rome, near Piazza del Popolo, accessible from Via del Babuino in the ancient Campo Marzio neighbourhood also known as the foreigner’s quarter. Via Margutta originally was home to modest…

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Photo index

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Size of original pictures: 5,616 x 3,744 pixels

Description

The Via Margutta is a narrow street in the centre of Rome, near Piazza del Popolo, accessible from Via del Babuino in the ancient Campo Marzio neighbourhood also known as the foreigner’s quarter. Via Margutta originally was home to modest craftsmen, workshops and stables, but now hosts many art galleries and fashionable restaurants. After the film Roman Holiday became popular, Via Margutta developed into an exclusive neighbourhood, where various famous people lived, such as film director Federico Fellini.

At the base of Pincio hill, in the Middle Ages an unknown artist opened the first workshop where the finest Roman craftsmen painted portraits, cut marble for fountains and forged metal plates, giving birth to a flourishing industry that attracted foreign artists (including Flemish and German), as well as Italians from other regions.

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